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Megan Lavengood is Assistant Professor and Area Director of Music Theory at George Mason University. Her research primarily deals with popular music, timbre, synthesizers, and recording techniques. She is also an active performer as a soprano in a Renaissance chamber ensemble.
Megan Lavengood is Assistant Professor and Area Director of Music Theory at George Mason University. Her primarily deals with popular music, timbre, synthesizers, and recording techniques. Her article on the iconic Yamaha DX7 electric piano sound appears in the Journal of Popular Music Studies. Her methodology for timbre analysis is described in a forthcoming article in Music Theory Online. Her current research projects focus on timbre in drum machines and acoustic percussion. As a pedagogue, she focuses on incorporating popular music as a step toward inclusivity of music students from non-traditional backgrounds. She has headed teams that won grants to redesign GMU’s core theory curriculum to be modular instead of sequential and to substantially expand the open educational resource Open Music Theory. She is also an active performer as a soprano in a Renaissance chamber ensemble.
Megan Lavengood is Assistant Professor and Area Director of Music Theory at George Mason University in Fairfax, VA (about 20 miles from Washington, DC). Her primarily deals with popular music, timbre, synthesizers, and recording techniques. Her article on the iconic Yamaha DX7 electric piano sound appears in the Journal of Popular Music Studies. Her methodology for timbre analysis is described in a forthcoming article in Music Theory Online. Her current research projects focus on timbre in drum machines and acoustic percussion, and are forthcoming in the Oxford Handbook of Electronic Dance Music and the Oxford Handbook of Orchestration Studies.

As a pedagogue, she focuses on incorporating popular music as a step toward inclusivity of music students from non-traditional backgrounds. She has headed teams that won grants to redesign GMU’s core theory curriculum to be modular instead of sequential (described in a forthcoming article in Engaging Students: Essays in Music Pedagogy and to substantially expand the open educational resource Open Music Theory.

Dr. Lavengood is originally from Cincinnati, OH, and holds a BM from Ohio University, an MM from Florida State University, and a PhD from the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Her primary instrument is piano, but she also works as a choral soprano, and currently holds a position as a soprano in a Renaissance chamber ensemble at St. John the Beloved in McLean, VA.