Sonic the Hedgehog analysis: article preview

I just uploaded two transcriptions I did of music from Sonic the Hedgehog 3. These transcriptions will support my essay in a forthcoming book, in which I analyze the timbre of “Ice Cap Zone” and “Marble Garden Zone.” Head over to the new page to check it out. Enjoy!

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Academic mixtapes

I want to make sure I don’t forget this incredible idea. S. Alexander Reed puts a little playlist together at the end of each of his chapters in his book Assimilate: A Critical History of Industrial Music. Love.

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Modular music theory

Disclaimer: this blog post might be riddled with errors and weird punctuation. I’m trying for the first time to use dictation to write this post instead of the keyboard. I have bad injury in my wrists, currently diagnosed as tendinitis, and I’m trying to avoid typing as much as possible.

I just won a grant for grant from my university to re-develop the music theory curriculum. In our grant proposal, we emphasized two major developments: a more thorough integration between theory and performance, and a modular design that gives students flexibility and choice.

Continue reading “Modular music theory”

Planning for 2018–2019

So I’ve covered what I did last year, and what I’m gonna do now (I hope). Here’s an even more hopeful/ambitious post: my goals for the 2018–2019 school year.

Read through my course journals from Fall 2017 and make adjustments.

I’ve taught a lot of the classes I teach here at Mason before at Brooklyn College and Florida State, but last year was the first time I forced myself to keep course journals. After each class (well, almost every class), I wrote at least one sentence commenting on the vibe of the class, what went well, what didn’t go well. I want to make this a purposeful activity and incorporate those observations into my adjustments for next year’s courses.

Set up SignUpGenius to have even better boundaries with student meeting times.

So yeah, I made a schedule for myself last year, but I had trouble sticking to it because I have trouble saying “no” to students sometimes if my schedule doesn’t work ideally with theirs. A colleague of mine suggested SignUpGenius as a way to have like an online appointment booking service for my office hours, like you would use for your hair stylist or something.

I’ve tested this out here. Sign up for a fake appointment with me—seriously! I want to see how it works. Feel free to let me know what you think of the layout, etc.

Get a Renaissance singing club running.

In New York, I was in an amateur choir called the Renaissance Street Singers, which was an amazing experience and taught me so much about casual music-making and all the joy it brings. I want to try to recreate that experience here in Fairfax. My idea is basically that it’s not so much a choir per se as a singing club. We’ll gather, read music, eat and drink, chat, and have fun. No need for performances at all, but maybe they could be added at a later stage. I believe in this as a project because it teaches people to not be so shy about their singing voices, you learn to love Renaissance music, you get better at sight singing, and you make friends. It’s the best.

At the beginning of the year, I made this website and posted a thing about it on my office door, but got swamped and couldn’t follow through. Next year I hope to get students and faculty interested, and attempt to figure out a good meeting time for everyone.

Goals for Summer 2018

So this is the second installment of my 3-day blogathon thing (with a past/present/future theme). Today’s focus is summer goals. I have a lot of professional and personal goals to achieve this summer, some of which I’ve already knocked out—so I’m getting started on the right foot, at least. (The philosophy of goals is to have both achievable goals as well as stretch goals, after all!)

Writing goals

In a teaching-heavy position like mine, it’s very difficult to make substantial progress on writing during the semester, and nigh impossible to do so in the first year of a new job. So the summer is the time for me to reconnect with my researcher side and take care of all those creative tasks that require ample space for thinking.

  1. Today: I just today finished a complete draft of a book chapter for an edited collection, titled “Timbre, Genre, and Polystylism in Sonic the Hedgehog 3” and sent it off to the editor. I’m sure there’s more revising to be done, but it feels good to complete a draft.
  2. Sometime in June: I am collaborating with other authors on an article on another chapter in another edited collection, which analyzes “Partition” by Beyoncé—this is the followup project from a “summer school” I attended in Summer of 2015 (gosh, three years ago!). I promised my group members I’d respond to critique from editors in June, so I’d better keep my promise.
  3. By Early July: I’m presenting my dissertation research at a timbre conference in Montreal, hosted by McGill. It’s a poster presentation, so I need to design a pretty poster.
  4. July/August: I just heard back from a journal yesterday that I’ve gotten a revise (substantially) and resubmit on an article I’ve been kicking around for quite a while now. While I’m slightly bummed at the extent of the revisions that they want, the review I got was very thorough and had a lot for me to work with. Nevertheless, I’m gonna kick that can down the road a bit while I come to terms with all that.

Teaching goals

  1. By June 1: I am going to submit an application for a grant on behalf of a committee of people who are wanting to revise the theory curriculum. I am trying to do a modular (i.e., non-sequenced) theory curriculum that incorporates an entire semester focused on jazz and pop music, among other things. We are also working to bring performance experience into the classroom in more tangible ways, like including a playing component to the typical battery of timed quizzes in the Theory I class.
  2. By June 4: Redesign the DMA comprehensive exams.
  3. By mid-July: I will have completed a course through my university that teaches professors how to design an online course through Blackboard. I teach a graduate course required for all masters’ students, and because of differing scheduling needs (educators need night classes; performers need day classes), offering the course online is an ideal presentation for this course. But, I don’t currently know how I’m going to make it as discussion-based and interactive as my in-person class. Hopefully completing the course will inform me a bit better. I’m applying for funding for this activity too.
  4. By the start of next semester: Provided we’re awarded the grant, I will work with other members of the curriculum re-design team to develop new materials for the theory courses, particularly the jazz/pop course. We won’t implement anything til Fall 2019 probably but it’s still good to get this work done early.

Personal goals

(Not-so-)fun fact! I, like a lot of professors, don’t get paid over the summer. This is part of the motivation for trying to acquire some of this money for redesigns. So I’m going to really try to limit the work I try to do over the summer to these projects listed above (granted, that’s probably way too much unpaid work still). Here’s my plans for summer relaxation:

  • Several camping trips. I used to go camping when I lived in Florida, but (shocker) I sold all my camping goodies when I moved to New York City. Now that I’m back in the #suburblife, and I own a Subaru Forester, camping is a lot more attainable than it had been. I just went camping last weekend at a park 15 minutes from my apartment. It sounds like a silly thing to do, but it was actually amazing. I’m hoping to do this spontaneously any nice weekend that I can. I have two more camping trips already planned this summer, to Assateague and Chincoteague islands, where the wild horses roam on the beach.
  • Other non-camping trips. I’m going to New York City again and so thrilled to hang out with old friends and eat some decent food and get a decent haircut at my old place. I still miss Brooklyn terribly. I’m also going on a family vacation with my dad, both my brothers, and my brothers’ partners to West Virginia. It’s a lot to handle but should be good quality time.
  • Video gaaaames. I’m still obsessed with Crusader Kings 2, which I have been for, I’m guessing, 5 years at least. It’s still fun. I’ve also been playing a lot on the Nintendo Switch, like Mario Kart. Hopefully Smash Bros will come out soon too.
  • Singing! My church job recently decided to employ a quartet over the summer to sing some more polyphony in the summer Latin masses. While my church choir job has been stressing me out a bit lately, I’m definitely down for one-to-a-part singing, anytime, anywhere.

It’s a… erm… ambitious program I’ve laid out for myself here—it’ll be interesting to check in at the end of the summer and see how much of this I was able to follow through on.

First year on the job

My last post was Jan 5, 2018, which was during the winter break between the Fall and Spring semesters. Now almost five months later, I’ve finished the Spring semester and thus my first year in my tenure-track job at George Mason. As my decreased posting frequency should tell you, I’ve been extremely busy this year getting oriented to my 3/3 teaching load (3 courses in each semester, Fall and Spring) and my new environs.

These next three days, I’m participating in a lovely Faculty Writing Retreat that Mason has put on. After each day concludes at 5pm, I’ll write up a short blog post with my observations reflecting on the 2017–2018 school year (today’s topic), my goals for Summer 2018, and my goals for the next year. Which brings us to my current topic: how I’ve grown in my first year on the job. They’re all interrelated, and I think they all come from the kind of inevitable boost in maturity and confidence that your first big-time job can sometimes slap into you.

Continue reading “First year on the job”

Using Scrivener to write your music dissertation or book

I am a huge, huge fan of Scrivener. (No, I am not a paid shill!) Scrivener is like a digital trapper keeper or scrapbook, with tons of options to organize, visualize, and move stuff around. Scrivener also has an iPhone app that syncs with your desktop app so you can write from your phone. Game changer.

I cannot overstate how much Scrivener helped me to write my first long document (my dissertation). By default, I think most people open up Microsoft Word or the equivalent when it’s time to write, and Word works fine for many years of one’s academic career. But long-form documents are a different beast, and a more flexible tool like Scrivener offers many advantages.

I’ll let you look up arguments for Scrivener on your own, as there are many (1, 2, 3). I’m going to focus instead on three practical tips for how Scrivener can make your life easier when you write your dissertation, thesis, or book: Continue reading “Using Scrivener to write your music dissertation or book”